Freshome.com - Interior Design & Architecture Magazinehttps://freshome.comFreshome is a website dedicated to show you the latest trends in modern architecture, modern interior design and modern furniture design.Mon, 15 Oct 2018 01:04:30 +0000en-UShourly1https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.8http://freshome.com/http://cdn.freshome.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/logo.pngFreshomeFreshInspirationForYourHomehttps://feedburner.google.comFall Head Over Heels for These 16 Headboardshttp://feedproxy.google.com/~r/FreshInspirationForYourHome/~3/xjYadxDKwqE/https://freshome.com/creative-headboards/#respondSun, 14 Oct 2018 11:00:25 +0000https://freshome.com/?p=291633Your bedroom is probably the room in your home that your guests see the least. That doesn’t mean it should be ignored, though. You spend a good part of your day in your bedroom, and you want to be able to wow the occasional guest who walks through. Fortunately, a single addition to your room […]

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Your bedroom is probably the room in your home that your guests see the least. That doesn’t mean it should be ignored, though. You spend a good part of your day in your bedroom, and you want to be able to wow the occasional guest who walks through. Fortunately, a single addition to your room can completely transform it. It’s time to start shopping headboards.

Adding an interesting headboard creates a focal point in your bedroom. A noteworthy headboard backing your bed is a multifunctional piece. It’s an interesting piece of furniture, it essentially doubles as art and it sets the tone for your room’s design. And your options for headboards are pretty much endless. Here are just a handful of ideas to get you started.

Geometric headboards

If you want to add a layer of visual interest to your bedroom, look no further than a geometric headboard. Different patterns, layers and textures draw the eye while also creating a canvas against which all other elements of the room can play.

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Geometric cutouts add depth and draw the eye to your headboard. Image: Belle Imaging

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A geometric headboard doesn’t have to look busy. A clean, white pattern adds texture without taking over the space. Image: Twinkle and Whistle

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You can use a geometric design to make your bedroom feel larger. Image: DVEKATI

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If you’re looking for a quirky, colorful touch in your bedroom, a geometric headboard can deliver. Image: Ensoul Ltd

Headboards with added height

Larger-than-life headboards define a room, adding a distinguished air and giving the entire space the sense that it’s been well-planned. If you want to make your bedroom look polished without having to buy an entire set of furniture and decor, a sky-high headboard is just the thing.

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A headboard extending all the way to the ceiling gives your bedroom definition. Image: Morgante Wilson Architects

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A tall, angled headboard draws the eye up and makes the space feel structured but open. Image: Castro Design Studio

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Converting an entire section of wall into a headboard gives a luxe feel. Image: Elms Interior Design

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Adding interesting touches, like this nailhead trim, helps a tall headboard make an even bigger splash. Image: Tamara Hubinsky Interiors

Headboards with extra width

If adding a tall headboard draws the eye up and makes a room feel open, adding a wide one makes it feel stable and established. And in a room where you go to rest and recuperate, a feeling of groundedness is key. If you’re looking to drop anchor with your bed, check out these wide headboards.

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An extra-wide headboard can serve as the foundation for your bed – and a gallery wall. Image: Esther Hershcovich

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Even if you already have a headboard you love, you can add a wide layer behind it to define your bed area. Image: Stephens Design Group, Inc.

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A wide headboard is a prime spot for mounted lighting and art. Image: Billinkoff Architecture

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Your wide headboard can wrap behind your nightstands, helping them feel rooted in the space. Image: Yiangou Architects

Headboards with storage

If you’re going to go all out with your headboard, why not make it do double-duty? A headboard with built-in storage can help you corral the items that inevitably collect on your nightstand, give a home to extra bedding or even create a place for you to showcase art. Here are just a few ideas to get you started.

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Built-in nightstands with shelves and drawers give you the chance to show off what you want but hide what you don’t. Image: Sims Hilditch

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Headboard in the front, linen closet in the back, this furniture piece pulls its own weight. Image: Andra Birkerts Design

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Who says you can’t have both? A more traditional headboard blends with a shelf for highlighting your favorite pieces. Image: Hannotte Interiors

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This layered headboard incorporates nightstands while anchoring the semi-floating bed in the room. Image: Lori Dennis

And all of this is just to get you started. Because your headboard can be the focal point of your bedroom, you’ve got wide creative berth with which to play. Choose the right headboard and you’ve made it easy to design your entire room. Looking for more inspiration? We’ve gathered up even more headboard ideas for you. Happy hunting!

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How to Visit Your New Home Construction Sitehttp://feedproxy.google.com/~r/FreshInspirationForYourHome/~3/-rDm5KfTMjE/https://freshome.com/visit-your-new-home-construction-site/#respondSat, 13 Oct 2018 11:00:27 +0000https://freshome.com/?p=289509After months of prep, your new construction home is finally starting to take shape. You’re excited, and you understandably want to track your home’s progress from top to bottom. Visiting your construction site is a great way to stay connected to your home throughout the process, but popping in unannounced could do more harm than […]

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After months of prep, your new construction home is finally starting to take shape. You’re excited, and you understandably want to track your home’s progress from top to bottom. Visiting your construction site is a great way to stay connected to your home throughout the process, but popping in unannounced could do more harm than good. If you plan to visit your new home during construction, remember that it’s about respect. Workers, superintendents and contractors are working hard on your home, and your visit shouldn’t derail their progress. Here are some things to keep in mind as you visit your new home construction site.

visit your new home safety

Talk to your builder about the potential to visit your new home. Image: Erotas Custom Builders

Talk to your builder

If you plan to visit your new home construction site, ask your builder about safety rules. Your builder likely has policies in place to protect homeowners from injury while visiting construction sites; ignoring those rules could put you at risk. Your builder may also invite you to the construction site for informal inspections throughout the build process, so scheduling your own visits could be unnecessary.

Make sure you follow all of your builder’s rules, especially those for safety. You might be counseled to wear certain clothes or be asked to leave your kids at home to reduce the builder’s liability in the event of an injury.

Schedule a time

Driving or walking by your build site every so often is no big deal, but if you want a closer look, it’s best to schedule a visit. A new build is a complicated dance of scheduling and contractors, and having you there could mean stopping work. While there may be contractors on site, your superintendent or general contractor might only come by once a day to check progress. Without a superintendent, you won’t have a reliable guide to walk you through the home. It’s unlikely that various contractors will know anything about your schedule or progress, so it’s best to wait until your super is there. That way, the build site can be decluttered for safety and you won’t be disrupting contractors as they try to get the job done.

Schedule an appointment with your super for a tour. Image: Domiteaux Architects

Dress appropriately

New build sites are messy, dusty and potentially dangerous. Visiting the site without the proper clothing and footwear could cause injury. Here are some general tips for dressing the part.

  • Wear closed-toe shoes. Exposed nails and wood splinters are common complaints for unfinished homes, and sandals and flip flops leave you at risk.
  • Expect to get dirty. Wear older clothes you don’t mind getting dirty and expect dust, paint and plaster.
  • Bring a flashlight and measuring tape. You might not have electricity, and a tape measure comes in handy for thinking about furniture or window treatments.
  • Follow all instructions for safety gear from your builder. Hardhats, gloves and goggles may be required for site visits.

If you don’t dress the part, your construction site visit could be cut short or be downright dangerous.

Document the visit

Don’t forget to spend some of your site visit documenting the build process. Pictures are great mementos, but documenting dates, measurements and processes can also help you in the future. Say you’d like to replace a light fixture, for example: Pictures you took during the process could help your electrician locate wiring and panels. Recording your paint colors means a better match when you accidentally scuff a wall. A shot of your newly framed wall allows you to find a strong stud before hanging a heavy mirror.

As you walk through your new build, take plenty of pictures and keep a folder of things like paint options, countertop choices and plumbing and electrical details. It might be hard to imagine now, but you’ll look back on the build process fondly. Having good documentation contributes to your home’s legacy.

When a new build feels like it’s dragging on and on, it’s important to visit your new home to stay sane. Tracking your home’s progress makes you feel more optimistic and enables you to see how far you’ve truly come. Just make sure a home visit doesn’t inadvertently throw your build off track. By scheduling a time with your builder and obeying safety rules, you can check out your progress and stay on schedule.

Do you have any additional tips for visiting a new build construction site? We’d love to hear them below.

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What Classifies a House Style: What Makes a Cape Cod Home?http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/FreshInspirationForYourHome/~3/4Dj3HsWQSlc/https://freshome.com/cape-cod-home/#respondFri, 12 Oct 2018 17:00:42 +0000https://freshome.com/?p=293511Cape Cod homes have been around for centuries, yet they continue to enchant us. This type of home, which is now synonymous with beachy style and weekends away, comes from very humble beginnings but still remains popular. That popularity led us to a question. What exactly is it that makes a Cape Cod-style home so […]

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Cape Cod homes have been around for centuries, yet they continue to enchant us. This type of home, which is now synonymous with beachy style and weekends away, comes from very humble beginnings but still remains popular. That popularity led us to a question. What exactly is it that makes a Cape Cod-style home so unique?

We’ve laid out the answer below. Keep reading to learn more about the long history of this quaint architectural style, what it is that sets the different types of Cape Cod homes apart and some defining characteristics of the style as a whole. By the end of this post, you should be able to consider yourself a Cape Cod expert.

Cape Cod

Cape Cod homes have been around since the time of the Puritan settlers. Image: REEF Cape Cod’s Home Builder

History of the Cape Cod home

Believe it or not, this style of home dates back to the times of the earliest Puritan settlers. It came about because they brought the idea of an English cottage to America and then adapted it to accommodate New England’s harsh winter climate.

The symmetrical design, arranged around a large, open living space – or “hall” as it was once called – is English in its tradition. However, the steep roofs were meant to minimize the weight of snow settling on the roof. The characteristic low ceilings were meant to conserve heat and the cute shutters were put in place to block harsh winter winds.

The term “Cape Cod house” wasn’t given to these cottages until the 1800s. The Reverend Timothy Dwight IV, President of Yale University, named them after a visit to Cape Cod. His observations from his visit were published posthumously in “Travels in New England and New York” (1821-22)

That said, the modern Cape Cods you see today were popularized during a Colonial Revival period in the 1920s and 1930s. Boston architect Royal Barry Willis reintroduced the Cape as a contemporary housing option. He retained the same basic exterior elements but adapted the interior layout for modern living. His work saw another boom after World War II, when the Cape’s simplistic layout made it a good fit to house returning soldiers.

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There are several variations on Cape Cod homes as we know them today. Image: Eagle Painting Inc

Variations on the Cape Cod home

Half Cape

Featuring a front door on one side of the home with two multi-paned glass windows on the other, this house was the starter home of its day. Settlers would often keep adding additions to it as their families grew until, eventually, it would transform into a three-quarter Cape. This type of home is sometimes also called a Single Cape.

Three-quarter Cape

This home features the front door to one side of the home with two multi-paned windows on one side and one multi-paned window on the other. It was the most popular style of Cape in the 18th and early-19th centuries.

Full Cape

Also known as a Double Cape, this style is common today but was rare among the settlers. It was reserved for the wealthiest among them. The full Cape has a central front door and two multi-paned windows placed symmetrically on either side. It also features a particularly steep roof and a massive chimney.

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Simplicity defines Cape Cod homes. Image: REEF Cape Cod’s Home Builder

Defining features of a Cape Cod

Though Cape Cod homes come in a variety of styles, there are a few defining features that bring them all together. Here is a general overview of what you can expect from this type of home:

Exterior:

  • Symmetrical appearance with a centered front entry
  • Steep roofs with side gables and an overhang
  • Shingle siding
  • Gabled dormers
  • Double-hung windows with shutters
  • Centralized chimneys
  • Simple exterior ornamentation

Interior:

  • 1 or 1.5 stories
  • Low ceilings
  • Symmetrical layout featuring a center hall
  • Large, open-concept living space
  • Bedrooms in dormers or under gables
  • Clean lines, little aesthetic detailing

Have you fallen in love with the Cape Cod-style home? Do you dream of owning one of your own someday? Tell us all about it in the comments below.

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Past the Pumpkin: 5 Ways to Decorate with Produce This Fallhttp://feedproxy.google.com/~r/FreshInspirationForYourHome/~3/2mGaUWOVVJ4/https://freshome.com/decorate-with-produce-this-fall/#respondFri, 12 Oct 2018 11:00:07 +0000https://freshome.com/?p=296803One of the best things about the fall season is gathering with loved ones as the weather cools. You share stories, glasses of wine and mugs of cider. It’s a cozy time of camaraderie. At least, that’s the idea. If you’re the one hosting, fall get-togethers can be a little stressful. The daunting task of […]

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One of the best things about the fall season is gathering with loved ones as the weather cools. You share stories, glasses of wine and mugs of cider. It’s a cozy time of camaraderie. At least, that’s the idea. If you’re the one hosting, fall get-togethers can be a little stressful. The daunting task of decorating for the holidays is just around the corner. Are you supposed to double your work (and storage needs) by having a full lineup of fall decor, too? Fortunately, you can decorate with produce to get the right look and make cleanup simpler.

People have used pumpkins to give their homes an autumnal aesthetic for decades. But you might be ready to switch it up. To help, we’ve gathered five different ways to decorate with produce this fall. Bonus: you can toss it all into a recipe, your compost or the trash when you’re done. No additional storage space needed!

decorate with produce

Butternut squashes can be quickly converted into rustic, seasonal vases. Image: HGTV

Butternut squash

Why use a traditional vase at your table when you can use a seasonal produce item instead? Cut the top off a butternut squash and hollow it out. You have a perfect vase for fall flowers. Chrysanthemums, dahlias and daisies in oranges, reds and yellows add to the seasonal feel. You can even use kale as filler in your arrangements to lean on produce that’s in season at the moment. Arrange several squashes of different heights together for a memorable fall centerpiece.

decorate with produce - corn

Corn stalks can help you establish a fall feel from the moment guests approach your home. Image: Rikki Snyder

Corn

If you’re looking for a high-impact way to make your front door look ready for the season, corn stalks are just the thing. Their height draws the eye and their rustic aesthetic makes your home look harvest-ready. And your options for decorating with corn don’t stop there.

Arrange corn in a circle and mount it on your door for a seasonal wreath. Gather a few colorful ears together with a fall-colored ribbon and attach them anywhere you want a touch of fall. You can also string them together with a long piece of twine and use it as a garland over your mantel or behind your dining room table.

decorate with produce - apples

Give your table an upgrade with a simple-to-create apple topiary. Image: HGTV

Apples

Are you looking to add a sculptural element to your table before hosting dinner this fall? HGTV has a brilliant DIY idea for you. Using a topiary ball, a bunch of small apples and some greenery, you can create a beautiful topiary centerpiece. Just skewer the apples to the topiary ball, fill in the gaps with greenery and voilà! You’re ready to wow your guests at dinner.

Or, if you want a versatile way to fill empty space on a coffee table, console table or anywhere else, make some small tea light holders. Hollow out a basin in the top of a few apples and set tea lights into each of them. Arrange them in a bunch to add some ambiance and a fall feel.

floating pool decorations for wedding Best of Floating candles with cranberries

The vibrant red of cranberries is ideal for fall but transitions easily to winter, too. Image: Bright Wedding Ideas

Cranberries

If you want to add some seasonal decor that can seamlessly move from fall to winter, cranberries are a perfect choice. Plus, their small size and vibrant color make them equal parts easy to decorate with and visually interesting. A favorite (and easy) way to utilize them is in candle holders. Arrange them around the base of a pillar candle in a large, clear vase or float some in a vase and add a candle to bob on top. To move the look from fall to winter, add sprigs of evergreen as the weather gets colder.

If you want to add a splash of color across a mantel or on a wall, string cranberries together and hang them as a garland.

decorate with produce - acorn squash

The humble acorn squash can get a quick and easy DIY upgrade. Image: Inspired by Charm

Acorn squash

If you love the look of pumpkin but want a way to spice it up this year, pick up a few acorn squashes. They come in a variety of colors, much like pumpkins, but their interesting shape can freshen your seasonal decor. You can decorate with the produce as-is, or you can dress it up a big with this simple DIY from Inspired by Charm. All you need is your squash, some thick twine and a hot glue gun. Wrap the twine along the top of the squash to emulate the cap of an acorn. Arrange these decorations on your mantel or on your Thanksgiving table for some autumnal charm.

More ways to decorate with produce

Late-season pears (especially the red variety) and figs are also beautiful additions to a fall tablescape. And, of course, you can intersperse some pumpkins to give things a signature seasonal feel.

Have you been inspired by any items found in the produce aisle? Let us know your favorite ways to decorate with produce in the comments.

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Small Cedar Home Reigns Over Farm-Field Landscapehttp://feedproxy.google.com/~r/FreshInspirationForYourHome/~3/KCZNKJAp2LQ/https://freshome.com/small-cedar-home-door-county/#respondThu, 11 Oct 2018 17:00:04 +0000https://freshome.com/?p=290955Salmela Architect recently completed the design of a charming contemporary home located in Door County, Wisconsin. The 1,093 square-foot crib reigns over a farm-field landscape and takes in the peacefulness of the surroundings. The small cedar home design caters to the expectations of a bohemian client named Beth. “House for Beth is a narrow three-room building with stepped […]

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small cedar home door countySalmela Architect recently completed the design of a charming contemporary home located in Door County, Wisconsin. The 1,093 square-foot crib reigns over a farm-field landscape and takes in the peacefulness of the surroundings. The small cedar home design caters to the expectations of a bohemian client named Beth.

House for Beth is a narrow three-room building with stepped pitched roofs that reflect the functions within,” the architects explained. “The tallest roof defines a bright, open living space with views to the landscape in all directions. The lower pitched roof houses the bathroom and bedrooms. A third lean-to structure is attached to the back which contains the mechanical room.”
small cedar home exteriorSimple white walls and natural pine additions make for inviting interiors. “Sequences of large fixed windows and smaller operable windows create an immediate visual connection to the surrounding site while providing ample opportunity for breezes to passively ventilate this narrow house,” the architects added. “Natural wood trim adds warmth, and a narrow black band of Richlite above a continuous pine shelf mimics the black splash band on the exterior. The furnishings are simple, modern and affordable, all from IKEA.”

Terraces on the north and south of the small cedar home provide the owners with plenty of outdoor space and shade during warm summer days. The small white fence defines the perimeter of the courtyard, including the integrated parking spots. White window frames complement the natural cedar siding. Photography by Paul Crosby.

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