Freshome.com - Interior Design & Architecture Magazinehttps://freshome.comFreshome is a website dedicated to show you the latest trends in modern architecture, modern interior design and modern furniture design.Wed, 15 Aug 2018 17:00:52 +0000en-UShourly1https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.7http://freshome.com/http://cdn.freshome.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/logo.pngFreshomeFreshInspirationForYourHomehttps://feedburner.google.com5 Ways to Use a Small-Space Mirrorhttp://feedproxy.google.com/~r/FreshInspirationForYourHome/~3/ro0ndbdSYcM/https://freshome.com/small-space-mirror/#respondWed, 15 Aug 2018 17:00:52 +0000https://freshome.com/?p=284965Do you have a small space you desperately want to look bigger? An easy way to add visual space to a room is that classic cheat: adding a small-space mirror.

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Do you have a small space you desperately want to look bigger? An easy way to add visual space to a room is that classic cheat: adding a small-space mirror.

Adding a mirror can literally double the space visually. But rather than installing mirrors willy-nilly, there are several ways to use mirrors that look stylish yet functional. From placing the mirror in unconventional places like on the ceiling to using segmented full-wall mirrors, these mirror ideas are great ways to add style while making a room look bigger.

Small-Space Mirror Bathroom Space

Cutting a mirror to fit sloping ceilings expands the mirror and allows the space to look that much bigger. Image: dblo associates

Extend mirrors in unconventional ways

Having a small space can mean some funky wall spaces, like dramatic sloping ceilings. In cases like these, you can have mirrors cut specifically to fit the space.

The benefits of putting a small-space mirror such as this into a space are twofold: It creates a unique, funky look, and it means that much more mirror to visually expand the area. When it comes to small rooms, it’s all about using every last inch of the space, and this idea makes for full use of that concept.

Small Space Mirror on Ceiling

A ceiling mirror adds a whole new dimension to the space from the top up. Image: Peter A. Sellar

Put mirrors on the ceiling

A hallmark of smaller spaces is that you may not have much wall space to work with. What you do have may be taken up by your most prized art or cherished photos. So if you find yourself in that position, try adding a mirror to the ceiling. The photo above shows how it can actually open up the space from the top.

A recessed mirror looks like it belongs in the design. In cases where a recessed mirror isn’t possible, try for a flat mirror with no frame that blends into the surrounding ceiling.

Small Space Mirror Full Wall Style

A full-wall mirror can have decorative elements like a segmented paneling design and distressed portions. Image: Ty Larkins Interiors

Use a full-wall small-space mirror

And then there’s the old standby favorite: a full-wall mirror. These are incredibly effective at visual expansion, as they give the illusion that you are missing a wall and looking into a whole other room.

However, you can still get creative with the full-wall small-space mirror concept. One popular choice is adding a grid pattern, which gives the mirror some sleek geometry. Adding a distressed touch to the mirror is also a great way to personalize it, like in the photo above.

Small Space Mirror Large Frame

A wood frame allows the mirror to blend into this rustic space. Image: Darren Palmer

Use large, framed mirrors

To go more classic, place a large, framed mirror on one wall. By adding a frame to a large mirror, you can incorporate the style of the room into the mirror itself.

For instance, a rustic space may use a distressed wood mirror frame. An industrial space may use a metal frame. A modern space can use a thin, minimalistic frame. And an artsy space can use a boldly colored mirror frame. A simple frame allows for easy customization on a small-space mirror.

Small Space Mirror Multiple Walls

One of the most dramatic ways to make a small room look larger is a wraparound mirror. Image: Alexey Trofimov

Try a wraparound mirror

To really add depth to your space, try adding two mirrors on adjacent walls. This creates geometric interest, with multiple degrees of reflection. More surrounding mirrors only add to the effect.

Wraparound mirrors work in any home style. But as the photo above shows, wraparound mirrors pair well with a highly textured wall. The textured wall adds visual interest and contrast against the sleek style of the mirror.

Using mirrors is one of the best ways to make a small space look bigger, but you don’t have to stop there. Check out some of our other ideas for bathroom mirrors throughout the house. What are some of your favorite mirror ideas? Let us know about it below!

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How to Unpack After a Move (Without Driving Yourself Crazy in the Process)http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/FreshInspirationForYourHome/~3/56nt6qqr6FY/https://freshome.com/unpack-after-a-move/#respondWed, 15 Aug 2018 12:00:40 +0000https://freshome.com/?p=284717You’ve probably heard lots of advice on how to pack before moving. But what about advice on how to unpack after a move? This process is just as stressful and, if the number of people who are still living out of boxes months after moving in is any testament, just as difficult to slog through. […]

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You’ve probably heard lots of advice on how to pack before moving. But what about advice on how to unpack after a move? This process is just as stressful and, if the number of people who are still living out of boxes months after moving in is any testament, just as difficult to slog through.

With that in mind, we’ve got some advice for you on how to unpack after a move. Read on to learn more about how to tackle this task strategically. If you follow our advice, you should be on track to become fully settled in less than two weeks after move-in day.

unpack after a move

Put your boxes in the right rooms from the get-go. Image: Christina Byers Design

Distribute your boxes strategically

Move-in days are crazy. You’ll probably feel rushed to try and empty your truck or van as fast as possible. It can be tempting to just throw all of your moving boxes in a pile close to the door and sort them out later. However, we’d strongly advise against this. Instead, we recommend taking the time to put your boxes into the rooms where they belong from the get-go.

This is where any labeling system you created while packing for the move will come in handy. Ideally, every box will be clearly marked with the room in which it belongs. (If not, it should be marked with some sort of explanation of its contents.) Save yourself the trouble of having to sort through everything twice and bring each box into the correct room directly from the car. This way, your unpacking can get off to an organized start.

clean

Clean before you start to unpack from a move. Image: Liz Schupanitz Designs

Clean before anything else

In real estate parlance, properties need to be “broom clean” before a new buyer or tenant moves in. Essentially, this phrase means free from any visible dirt. However, as any person who’s completed a move recently knows, there’s rarely time in the midst of it all to make sure that your whole home has gotten a deep clean.

With that in mind, you’re going to want to do some cleaning of your own before you start to unpack after a move. We suggest keeping a selection of cleaning essentials – things like paper towels, all-purpose cleaners, and a broom – accessible as you unload your car or truck. That way, it can be one of the first things that you unpack.

unpack

Unpack one room at a time. Image: DESIGNS! – Susan Hoffman Interior Designs

Unpack rooms by importance

When it’s finally time to unpack, you’ll want to do so in an orderly fashion. We recommend unpacking room-by-room, in order of importance. This means unpacking the whole room at one time, rather than just grabbing the essentials and leaving the rest for later. Yes, it’s a bigger task upfront, but you’re less likely to have boxes of non-essential items laying around long after you’ve settled in.

In terms of the order in which you unpack, you’ll want to start with your bedrooms first. After the move, you’ll likely be exhausted and want to head to bed fairly early. This way, your bed will be waiting for you. Next, you should tackle the kitchen, followed by your main living space.

After that, you can move on to lesser-used spaces like your dining room, guest bedroom, and formal living area. Last but not least, you can tackle any supplemental storage areas like a basement or garage.

dclutter

Donate any unused items after you’ve settled in. Image: California Closets – DC Metro

Declutter once more

In unpacking, there’s one golden rule to follow: Everything has its place. This means that for each item you take out of the box, you should have a rough idea of where you want to put it in your new home. And you should put it in its place immediately. Any items that you’re unsure about should go back in the box.

After you’ve been in your home for a while – let’s say two weeks, to be safe – it’s time to take a long, hard look at any items that you still have left in boxes. Ask yourself: Do you really need these items? Do they truly have a place in your new home? Have you missed using them on a daily basis?

If the answer to the majority of these questions is no, think about either donating the items or throwing them away. Now is the time to declutter even further. There’s no sense in having half-empty moving boxes laying around forever. Nor is there sense in storing items that you likely won’t use again. Your best bet is to give them to someone who can use them.

Do you have any other tips for how to unpack after a move?

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5 Stylish and Functional Garden Edging Ideashttp://feedproxy.google.com/~r/FreshInspirationForYourHome/~3/Xq_u4LPidFc/https://freshome.com/garden-edging-ideas/#respondTue, 14 Aug 2018 21:00:23 +0000https://freshome.com/?p=288833Whether you’re designing a garden from scratch or trying to figure out ways to make your current garden more attractive, you might want to consider looking at garden edging ideas. Garden edging is not mandatory. Plenty of gorgeous garden spaces simply sit right next to the lawn. But adding garden edging helps create a visual […]

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Whether you’re designing a garden from scratch or trying to figure out ways to make your current garden more attractive, you might want to consider looking at garden edging ideas. Garden edging is not mandatory. Plenty of gorgeous garden spaces simply sit right next to the lawn. But adding garden edging helps create a visual barrier between the garden and other spaces. It creates a certain visual logic in your yard. Functionally, lining a garden has its benefits; it can stop the plants from growing outside of their designated space. You can see several garden edging ideas below.

Garden Edging Small Stone

Stone is an attractive way to line a garden. Image: Niza

Gravel/stone strip as garden edging

This no-fuss, functional idea creates some geometry in the space. As the photo above shows, stone makes a solid visual barrier separating the shrubbery from the rest of the lawn. It also shows how you can add geometric art to the style to further visually separate the space, as in the boxy brown features.

It’s an easy design in that it’s not difficult to line a garden or shrubbery space with stone. If you use mulch in your bedding, it also helps create a barrier between the grass and the mulch. That way, you’re not getting mulch mixed into the lawn while you try to carefully rake the mulch along the grass line.

Garden Edging Gravel Pathway

Divider rock works well in segmented garden spaces. Image: Surrounds Landscape Architecture + Construction

Gravel paths and divider rock

Another idea for lining gardens is to place brick around the garden spaces themselves. This creates an easy and visually clean barrier. It’s especially useful if you have walking paths between the garden space, like in the design above.

This is a good design if you tend to grow a lot of different plants. That way, each patch of dirt can be devoted to one plant. For instance, one patch might have a certain type of flower and another might have ferns. A whole section could be devoted to growing different types of vegetables. This design lends an organizational logic to a landscape.

Garden Edging Raised Garden

Raised gardens can be a convenient way to take care of plants. Image: Casa Smith Designs

Raised gardens

A classic way to designate a garden space is to go for a raised design. This can be helpful for people with bad backs, or anyone else who doesn’t want to spend a lot of time bending over when working in the garden. It’s also a visually appealing way to keep a garden organized and segmented.

The photo above shows some of the attractive designs a raised garden can make, like the star design in the middle of the space. Raised, segmented gardens are another good way to designate different spaces for a certain vegetable or herb. Keeping to a textured wood helps the space look natural and rustic.

Garden Edging Brick Pathway

Brick pathways are a clean idea for segmenting a garden. Image: BrightView

Brick paths

Yet another attractive way to make garden edging is to go for a brick pathway design. A raised stone pattern on the edge of the path visually separates the path from the garden. And by choosing a tight brick design, you virtually eliminate the chance of weeds and other plants growing out into the pathway, as tends to happen in graveled areas.

Brick paths are a good design if you like to spend time strolling in your garden, as you can create as many winding pathways as your space can accommodate. And it’s another nice way to create patches of dirt that can be devoted to certain plant themes, if you wish.

Garden Edging Rustic Pathway

Keep it looking rustic with naturally-cut stone. Image: FifthSeason

Rustic stone

You can also use some rustic stone as garden edging. The photo above shows how rough-cut stones set next to each other create an easy, natural garden lining. This design is a good way to create a barrier around a rustic gravel pathway because it helps the look keep to a more natural design.

As the photo above shows, this type of stone edging works well in spaces where the plant life is arranged to make it look like it’s more dense, free-growing and natural. If you don’t want a garden that looks too boxy and pre-planned, this is your design. In fact, it’s probably one of the most natural garden edging ideas.

How will you use garden edging to give your outdoor space new life?

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Not Your Father’s Laminate: Check out These Woodgrain, Stone and Matte Finisheshttp://feedproxy.google.com/~r/FreshInspirationForYourHome/~3/g-3P5_hekbc/https://freshome.com/laminate/#respondTue, 14 Aug 2018 17:00:24 +0000https://freshome.com/?p=285755Laminate used to look cheap and cheesy. It was durable, but certainly not fashionable. However, times have changed, and now the material is much more realistic-looking. In fact, it can mimic many of your favorite materials, which makes it an excellent, inexpensive design choice. Whether you choose to implement it on floors, countertops or even […]

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Laminate used to look cheap and cheesy. It was durable, but certainly not fashionable. However, times have changed, and now the material is much more realistic-looking. In fact, it can mimic many of your favorite materials, which makes it an excellent, inexpensive design choice. Whether you choose to implement it on floors, countertops or even walls, there’s sure to be a use for laminate in any room of your house. Read on to learn more about how to incorporate this once-taboo material into your home.

Laminate flooring

One of the benefits of laminate flooring is that it can easily mimic a variety of materials: wood, stone and even tile. No matter what your design needs are, there’s likely a laminate to match. And while it doesn’t have the same properties as the material it mimics, it’s still a more affordable way to get that visual effect.

Modern laminate floors are also easy to install, unlike older versions that required glue. Claire E. Tamburro of Tamburro Interiors explains, “Laminate flooring comes in sheets and planks and is either installed as a ‘floating floor,’ meaning there is no adhesive holding it in place, or adhesive is used to install.” However, she warns that the floating floor option can sound hollow and create an echo. “Some manufacturers add a cork layer to the back of the planks to provide an added acoustical layer.” This softens potential unwanted noise as you walk across the floors.

Worried about damaging or cleaning your floor? Never fear; some brands are water-resistant and scratch-resistant, and many don’t require waxing or polishing. “Laminate flooring looks very realistic and is generally easy to clean with a vacuum and damp mop,” adds Tamburro. “It can scratch and get dings and dents over time, but overall, it is a durable material.” This resiliency makes it perfect for high-traffic areas.

laminate tile floor

The gray tile laminate floor in this office complements the gray wall, but these floors also come in black, brown, red, tan and even yellow. Image: LeTricia Wilbanks Design

laminate wood

This beach-style home uses coastal flooring. Image: Randall Lee’s Flooring America

laminate chairs

This medium-colored floor complements the light furniture and looks convincing as a wood substitute. Image: Ogden’s Flooring and Design

Laminate countertops

Mina Fies, creator of the Renovation Roadmap and the founder and CEO of Synergy Design & Construction, tells Freshome, “The biggest laminate trend I’m seeing in the residential remodeling and design industry is increased use in countertops and cabinetry.”

It’s no surprise, really. An actual granite or marble countertop could cost $120 per square foot to install. However, the Formica marble laminate countertops in the photos below range between $14 and $38 per square foot. The money you save on countertops allows you to splurge on other items.

What’s more, these countertops often look just like the real deal. “Formica in particular has some new edges in its ‘Ideal Edge’ collection which makes it appear the pattern is throughout the whole countertop (like stone), when in reality it’s just wrapped around the edge,” says Fies.

“Most laminates are available in simulated wood and stone looks, often with an embossed texture that makes them even more realistic,” adds Tamburro. High gloss and matte options also provide a well-finished and modern look.

To clean stains on a laminate countertop, use a mild detergent with water and a nylon brush and use a circular motion. Then blot with a soft, clean cloth. You should never use harsh, abrasive cleaners or materials, which can cause permanent staining. And a word of caution in kitchens: Don’t rest hot pots and pans on a Formica countertop. As with other materials, it can leave a permanent burn mark.

laminate countertop

This kitchen’s Formica Calacatta marble countertops look like the real thing. Image: Formica

laminate infinity

In this minimalist kitchen, laminate countertops complement the stone slab backsplash. Image: Keating Moore Construction

laminate bathroom

This countertop mixes high-end materials with a laminate bathroom countertop. Image: Jagoe Homes

laminate black

This sleek, black countertop feels just as sophisticated as the rest of the bathroom. Image: Phase II General Contractor, Inc.

Other uses for laminate

Because laminate is so easy to work with, you don’t have to feel limited to the traditional floors and countertops. Need an accent wall? Laminate could do the trick; just look at the wood headboard in the bedroom photo below.

Or, for a more out-of-the-box choice, try finishing your kitchen cabinets in laminate. It’s an unconventional choice, given the material’s formerly taboo nature, but it’s an inexpensive way to give your kitchen that little extra something.

laminate bedroom

The wood laminate headboard wall is functional and provides a nice contrast to the white elements in the room. Image: Capital Building

laminate cabinets

Laminate kitchen cabinets are an inexpensive option. Image: JMA Interior Design

“Laminate is no longer reserved just for floors,” Fies says. “Demand is being driven by the new and improved quality of options now available, and this is changing the way we all think about laminate. Regardless of your design idea, laminate can handle it.”

What about you? Will you be incorporating this material into your design? We’d love to hear about it in the comments below.

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5 Modern Ways to Use Wood Panelinghttp://feedproxy.google.com/~r/FreshInspirationForYourHome/~3/XvSjskvm5Nk/https://freshome.com/wood-paneling/#respondTue, 14 Aug 2018 12:00:51 +0000https://freshome.com/?p=286531Wood paneling was all the rage in the mid-20th century, before falling out of favor for decades. If you wanted an updated home, the first thing to go was the wood paneling on the walls. Bright, sleek colors were used to replace what was seen as dated wood textures. But now wood paneling is back. People […]

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Wood paneling was all the rage in the mid-20th century, before falling out of favor for decades. If you wanted an updated home, the first thing to go was the wood paneling on the walls. Bright, sleek colors were used to replace what was seen as dated wood textures.

But now wood paneling is back. People are finding clever ways to use it in a variety of modern styles. With some sleek geometry, creative stylings and light colors, wood paneling fits well into the updated, modern space. Read on for several ways to use wood paneling in your modern home.

Wood Paneling Lines Geometry

Warm wood paneling creates great contrast with cool grays. Image: Heritage Construction Companies

Use wood paneling to create sleek lines

A wonderful aspect of wood paneling is that it can produce sleek geometry. By cutting the paneling into narrow strips, you can get a more lined, geometric look. Modern spaces are all about stark geometry, so this is a key way to use wood paneling in a modern style.

The photo above shows that changing the direction of paneling between the ceiling and the walls adds visual interest and bold geometry. You can also try switching it up, with narrow panels on the ceiling and wider panels on the wall.

Wood Paneling Section Style

Wood paneling plays well with geometric elements like the vertical design over the balcony. Image: AGSIA Design Group

Create segmented spaces

Another way to incorporate modern wood paneling is to use it on just a small portion of the room. In the photo above, a narrow area of paneling surrounded by white walls actually helps the space look more modern. The wood area creates a sudden change in texture, generating visual interest.

The wood paneling also acts as a visual barrier for the sitting area by the TV, which is a good way to separate different spaces in the open-concept areas that modern spaces are known for.

Wood Paneling Accent Wall Reclaimed

Wood paneling fits right into a rustic chic style. Image: Creative Floors

Opt for rustic chic

A popular modern style in homes is rustic chic. That’s where elements of rustic design combine with more modern elements. For instance, in the photo above, the rustic accent wall (made from reclaimed barn wood) complements the modern white chairs.

Another interesting element is the herringbone layout of the wall, demonstrating again the value of geometric designs. The distressed texture of the wood adds even more interest.

Wood Paneling Three Dimensional

Three-dimensional wood paneling can be subtle and still have a huge impact. Image: Legacy Construction Northeast

Go for three-dimensional geometry

Yet another option for updating the idea of wood paneling is to try a more three-dimensional style. This is easy to accomplish: Simply raise a few panels above the main backdrop. It’s a funky style that fits well with modern styles, since modern aesthetics tend to veer towards creative geometry and three-dimensional home features.

What’s more, this idea is highly customizable. You could choose large square panels at different heights, like in the photo above, or opt for narrow, long panels. You could also go for smaller panels of different sizes for a collage effect.

Wood Paneling Light Color

Light-colored paneling fits naturally with modern color schemes. Image: Berg Design Architecture

Use light colors and lots of windows

For a fresh take on a modern room, stick to paneling that has lighter colors. Lighter colors, in general, help the space feel more open. The light color of the walls breaks up the wood paneling on the ceiling and floors, and the light gray stone on the fireplace creates an interesting focal point.

Many people with modern tastes may consider an abundance of wood to feel cramped — likening it to a cozy cabin. The style above counters this fear with lots of natural light. We’ve also spent some time detailing additional ways to brighten up a space.

Wood paneling doesn’t have to feel tacky or dated. With any of these tips, it can actually work to your benefit in making a space feel more modern. Will you be incorporating this classic material into your home? Let us know about it below!

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