Freshome.com - Interior Design & Architecture Magazinehttps://freshome.comFreshome is a website dedicated to show you the latest trends in modern architecture, modern interior design and modern furniture design.Mon, 20 Aug 2018 23:25:22 +0000en-UShourly1https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.8http://freshome.com/http://cdn.freshome.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/logo.pngFreshomeFreshInspirationForYourHomehttps://feedburner.google.comTiny Homes: What’s the Real Deal?http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/FreshInspirationForYourHome/~3/5vbPzl0dOeo/https://freshome.com/tiny-homes-construction/#respondMon, 20 Aug 2018 17:00:50 +0000https://freshome.com/?p=284883When it comes to building homes, size matters. And while others might subscribe to the idea that bigger is better, tiny houses are making a huge impact on the housing market. From tiny house buying TV shows to builders specializing in tiny homes, extreme downsizing is shaking up real estate. Building a tiny home on […]

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When it comes to building homes, size matters. And while others might subscribe to the idea that bigger is better, tiny houses are making a huge impact on the housing market. From tiny house buying TV shows to builders specializing in tiny homes, extreme downsizing is shaking up real estate. Building a tiny home on the cheap can definitely seem like a smart swap, but what’s the process really like?

Before you start dreaming small, do your research. What may seem like your ticket to financial freedom might be more expensive than you thought. In some cases, a tiny home can become a big pain. Understanding the process from start to finish can help you decide if a tiny home should be part of your future.

tiny homes - dining

Give tiny home living a try before committing. Image: Matthew Heritage

Thinking tiny

Before you dive headfirst into all things tiny, do some due diligence and research. If the tiny house trend has bitten you hard, here are some ways you can think objectively to decide whether it’s a feasible option for you and your family.

  • Read up on city codes. Most cities have codes that dictate the size of homes within city limits. In some cases, this could prohibit tiny homes altogether. Other cities may allow tiny homes, but only in certain areas such as mobile home developments. Find out what your city says about tiny homes and consider how this could affect the building process.
  • Understand land. Whether you choose a mobile tiny home or you’d like to put down roots with a stationary foundation, don’t forget to add the cost of land into your building budget. If land makes the idea cost prohibitive, you could consider leasing land, asking family to give up a piece of their land or looking for more affordable locations.
  • Consider your motivations. Understand why tiny houses are appealing to you. Is it just because you like their trendy nature? Or are you more interested in lowering your cost of living? Because tiny homes are a way of life, you’ll need to have strong motivations to make a large change to your current lifestyle.
  • Test drive tiny. Not sure if tiny living would be right for you? Give it a test drive. Rent a tiny home for the weekend and see how you like the idea of downsizing.
  • Price it per square foot. You might be surprised to find that a tiny home doesn’t always give you the most bang for your buck. Always price the home and land out per square foot and compare that to other living situations – a smaller home or apartment, for example – before you jump on the bandwagon.
tiny homes - porch

A tiny home means big design plans. Image: Sol Haus Design

Designing tiny

If you’ve decided that you want to go ahead and build a tiny home, you should know that the design process is very different from designing a standard home. It’s important to work with a designer who knows how to maximize every square inch of your home with smart solutions. The key to loving your tiny home is livability. Consider these factors when working on the design of your home.

  • Find the right designer. Seek out a designer that specializes in tiny homes or purchase your plans from a well-known tiny home manufacturer. While the homes are small, they require a lot of expertise. You might be able to sketch a general idea of the floorplan you’d like, but leave the details to an expert.
  • Start downsizing. Don’t wait until moving day to downsize your possessions. Start getting rid of and storing things now; it’ll be easier to make the transition if you start thinking small now, rather than making a big change when you move into your home.
  • Measure everything. Planning on keeping some of your furniture? Keep a measuring tape handy and use it to guide the design process. If you’re set on bringing your bed with you, you’ll need to design a sleeping area big enough to accommodate it and other bedroom furniture.
  • Give yourself wiggle room. One of the biggest mistakes buyers make when designing a tiny home is designing it just big enough to fit their current possessions. If you’re like most people, however, you’ll continue to accumulate stuff after you move in, so it’s important to give yourself wiggle room in the form of empty storage.
tiny homes - interior

Maximize every inch with smart storage. Image: Tiny Happy Homes

Building tiny 

You’ve come up with a design you love and are ready to build. Because tiny homes are built on a smaller scale, they’re pretty much a DIYer’s dream. Still, you might be surprised at the scope of expertise required for some of the tiny to-do list.

  • Use a builder. If you’re not particularly handy, a house isn’t the project on which to cut your teeth. Use a builder if you’re a newbie, or hire a contractor to oversee the project and step in for trickier stuff (think plumbing and electrical).
  • Avoid major changes. Sure, an outhouse bathroom would save space in the home, but going from indoor plumbing to something a little more antiquated makes the jump from standard to tiny living harder. Build the home so that it mimics your current way of life for an easier transition.
  • Budget better. Don’t forget to create a building budget that makes sense. Sure, you might be able to build your home on the cheap, but there are other costs involved. Add land, land improvement and utility costs to your budget to stay on track.
  • Enlist help. Tiny homes are perfect crowdsourcing projects. Save money by enlisting friends and family for an afternoon of labor. Because the scope of the project is smaller, you can get more out of just a few hours of help.
tiny homes - exterior

Living in a tiny home might require a few adjustments. Image: Timbercraft Tiny Homes

Living tiny

Move-in day might seem like the finish line to a tiny house race. Remember, though, that moving into a tiny home can be a big adjustment. Give yourself time to get used to the new arrangement by settling in little by little.

  • Keep it clean. Tiny homes get messier faster; it’s a fact. With each surface and storage area of the home pulling double duty, it’s best to keep your home clean and clutter free. Invest in good storage solutions and make sure your home stays neat with a daily chore list.
  • Maximize outdoor space. The outdoor space surrounding your tiny home can make your living quarters feel much more spacious. Seating and cooking areas outside can relieve some of the cramped feeling of a tiny house.
  • Have an exit strategy. Tiny homes aren’t for everyone. It’s OK to admit that you preferred more space. Having an exit strategy in place can stop you from feeling trapped. Make a deal that you’ll try tiny living for six months. After that, if you want to throw in the towel, you’ll feel better knowing that you gave it a try. You’ll also take some valuable life hacks to your new place.

Tiny homes always look trendy, smart and streamlined on TV. It’s important to remember, however, that those tiny spaces are inhabited by real people after the cameras stop rolling. In real life, homes get messy, spaces get cramped and bumping into your partner stops being cute after the thousandth time. By going into the process with your eyes wide open, there are fewer chances for surprises and you have a better chance at making a tiny home work for you.

What about you? Would you ever consider living in a tiny home?

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5 Unexpected Ways to Use Wood Textures in the Kitchenhttp://feedproxy.google.com/~r/FreshInspirationForYourHome/~3/r2CfcFZkV-U/https://freshome.com/wood-textures-in-the-kitchen/#respondMon, 20 Aug 2018 12:00:57 +0000https://freshome.com/?p=287189Wood is a common material for kitchens, from cabinets to walls to countertops. You can also use wood textures in the kitchen in surprising ways to create some visual interest and a style all your own. You can use wood in unexpected ways or in unexpected places to make a statement in a space. So […]

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Wood is a common material for kitchens, from cabinets to walls to countertops. You can also use wood textures in the kitchen in surprising ways to create some visual interest and a style all your own. You can use wood in unexpected ways or in unexpected places to make a statement in a space. So if you’re looking for something creative to do with a kitchen design, take a look at the different ways to use wood textures in the kitchen.

Wood Textures in the Kitchen Island Wood

Textured wood creates some interesting contrast against the cabinets’ gray color. Image: Stonington Cabinetry and Designs

Match wood in interesting places

One idea is to take a highly distinctive wood texture and use it in unexpected places with high contrast. The photo above shows how the warm, textured wood from the island was also used over the cooktop area. This wood contrasts with the sleek gray cabinetry. Using a certain kind of wood for the island and extending it to other areas of the room creates design cohesion in the space.

You can use this idea in a variety of ways. You could use the wood texture in the flooring to line the cabinets, for instance. Or you could use the wood texture in the chairs on the countertops. You can get as creative as you want with this idea.

Wood Textures in the Kitchen Gray Cabinets

Wood works well in modern styles. Image: Ania Stempi Design

Combine wood with sleek, modern designs

In the photo above, we see another example of how to use wood to create an appealing contrast against cabinets. The sleek, gray cabinets look almost futuristic and the range hood style adds to the modern look, but the warm wood creates a sort of natural feel. What results is some subtle contrast using wood textures in the kitchen, helping the kitchen feel modern but not stark.

The naturally textured stone countertop is serves as a nice dividing line between the modern and classic styles. The countertop has the sleek lines of updated styles but the natural stone makes it look slightly rustic. It serves as the unifying point in the style.

Wood Textures in the Kitchen Contrast Wood

Deep, saturated hues create an attractive contrast with wood textures. Image: Holmes Hole Builders

Mix and match wood textures

There are so many wood textures out there, you can also stick to wood alone to create a contrasting style. The style in the photo above contrasts highly textured darker barn wood walls against a lighter ceiling and floor.

You can see further contrast in the stainless steel refrigerator and appliances, giving this rustic space a modern touch. A blue and gray color scheme on the cabinets and kitchen area itself also juxtaposes with the surrounding natural wood. It goes to show that if you want to use wood textures in the kitchen in surprising ways, think high contrast.

Wood Textures in the Kitchen Abstract Wood

A more conceptual wood texture works well in modern spaces. Image: Scott Weston Architecture Design PL

Go for abstract wood textures in the kitchen

What is abstract wood, exactly? The photo above shows the style on the drawers and island. Wood isn’t typically that gray, nor is it textured exactly like that. But the style still evokes a feeling of a wood texture.

When paired with the bright orange minimalistic cabinets, high-gloss white backsplash and black wire chair, you have a thoroughly modern space while still being able to evoke warmth. You can also get a style like this by using an exterior addition like a kitchen cabinet vinyl wrap.

Wood Textures in the Kitchen Rustic Countertop

Go natural for some unique style. Image: SF ARC Architecture

Use wild, rustic texture

Another idea for using unexpected wood textures in the kitchen is to go as natural as you possibly can. The photo above shows a countertop that looks like the wood was just dragged right out of the forest and thrown onto the kitchen island.

When combined with the sleek white design of the rest of the kitchen, it’s another interesting high-contrast style. Warm wood floors stop the countertop from looking too out of place. You could use similar highly rustic textures in other countertop spaces or in chairs and stools, too.

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12 Living Room Rug Ideas That Will Change Everythinghttp://feedproxy.google.com/~r/FreshInspirationForYourHome/~3/v1Mw66oqtUc/https://freshome.com/12-living-room-rug-ideas/#respondSun, 19 Aug 2018 12:00:47 +0000https://freshome.com/?p=287161We’re always interested in easy ways to rev up living room decor. If you can only add one item to make a big impact in your space, an area rug is an excellent choice. The right living room rug can pull all of your accent colors together, add pattern to a neutral color palette or […]

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Contemporary living room rug

A modern pattern with accents of black and gold jazz up a neutral living room rug. Image: Rejuvenation

We’re always interested in easy ways to rev up living room decor. If you can only add one item to make a big impact in your space, an area rug is an excellent choice. The right living room rug can pull all of your accent colors together, add pattern to a neutral color palette or soften hard edges in a contemporary room.

5 things to consider when choosing a new living room rug

  • Size: Make sure your rug is the right scale for your room.
  • Color: Your new rug looks best if it features at least two of your accent colors.
  • Comfort: Choose a rug you love, but it’s also important that it feels good underfoot.
  • Care: Check the cleaning and maintenance of any rug you are considering.
  • Style: The good news is that almost all rug styles are almost neutral — color is more important than pattern.

When you’re choosing a new living room rug, confirm it fits your seating area by measuring. Most designers suggest a rug that is large enough to cover a conversation area, with the front legs of your sofa and chairs on the rug to anchor the space. Rug designs are so versatile that you can mix one that you love with any decor style, as long as the color is right. Here are 12 stylish living room rug ideas to fuel your inspiration:

teal area rug

The Looking Glass rug adds romance to a living room with an impressionistic floral pattern. Image: Perigold

1. Create a coastal vibe with a dreamy blue rug

It’s easy to create a beach-inspired living room with a new rug and a few accessories. Choose an airy rug with ocean blues and a light neutral color like beige, gray or white. Soft stripes, or florals like the CompanyC Looking Glass rug pictured above, can provide the perfect pattern for your living room makeover.

pink boho rug

The Aliyah rug brings a bright accent of pink to a neutral living room. Image: Joss & Main

2. Add pretty boho color with a pink area rug

If you’re looking to go a little boho but aren’t ready to paint bright colors, adding a vibrant rug might be all you need. Bright colors are easier on the eye when they’re on the floor, so this is your chance to really indulge in a fun hue. We love the instant transformation of a living room with just that one perfect item, like the Aliyah Area Rug from Joss & Main.

Mid-Century Modern rug

This mid-century modern-style rug’s bold pattern livens up a neutral room. Image: West Elm

3. The perfect start for a hip mid-century modern living room

We love the colorful furniture and clean lines of mid-century modern decorating. In most decorating styles, area rugs are the perfect place to add vibrant colors. In mid-century style, colored furniture is often the focal point, so look to your area rug for a bold pattern instead. West Elm’s Abrash rug brings a muted graphic print to your living room to highlight your amazing furniture.

Tropical rug

Go bold and tropical with the CompanyC Captiva Rug. Image: Perigold

4. Add fun with a tropical-inspired area rug

If you’d love a more tropical style for your living room but want to skip over-the-top themed decor, try a bold area rug like the CompanyC Captiva Rug. The vibrant colors and big pattern would be too much for a sofa or chair, but strike the right tone on the floor. You can pick up accent colors from the rug’s palette in throw pillows and artwork for a pulled-together look.

gold rug

Use matching rugs for an adjacent dining room. Image: Rejuvenation

5. Use area rugs to coordinate your living and dining room style

We love open home design that seamlessly blends dining and living rooms for a comfortable space. The challenge with open floor plans is finding a way to tie two living spaces together while giving each space its own identity. Choosing the right dining room rug can create a unified yet unique look for your great room. Color is the easiest way to tie your two spaces together — by either choosing a shared color for each rug or totally different patterns in the same color (like stripes and florals.)

Copper living room rug

A gorgeous abstract rug in copper tones is a bold choice for any space. Image: West Elm

6. Natural rugs don’t have to be boring

West Elm’s Mineral Rug in Copper is inspired by molten metals, giving it a powerful presence in any living room. You could easily build your color scheme around a statement rug like this, or add it to your living room as an on-trend accent piece.

Pottery barn rug

This neutral beauty is perfect for mixing warm and cool neutral colors in your living room. Image: Pottery Barn

7. Bring on-trend gold accents into your living room

We can’t get enough of the brushed gold accents that are everywhere right now. If you’ve wanted to add a touch of gold without replacing all of your brushed nickel decor, here is your chance. Pottery Barn’s Talia rug appears at first to have a beautifully neutral gray pattern — look closer to see the touches of warm gold. This subtle mix of gold and gray can be the bridge between your old metal finishes and the new.

Aqua boho rug

The Sammat rug in aqua is a stylish and easy update for a small living room. Image: Urban Outfitters

8. The rental-friendly living room rug makeover

Looking for the absolute easiest way to add color to your rental without picking up a paintbrush? Urban Outfitters’ Sammat rug is like an instant apartment makeover. Pair your boho rug with a colorful velvet sofa, and your living room is guest-ready.

Blue living room rug

Pottery Barn’s Bosworth rug is beautiful and versatile for a variety of styles. Image: Pottery Barn

9. A traditional rug with a contemporary twist

A living room decorated in just one style can look dated and tired over time. An easy way to decorate with timeless style is to choose decor with a modern vibe. Yes, you can even do this when you’re decorating a traditional room. Subtle variations from your main style can make your living room more interesting. Look for contemporary patterns in traditional colors, like Pottery Barn’s Bosworth rug.

black and white rug

This black and white rug is just right for a casual living room. Image: Urban Outfitters

10. Anchor an eclectic living room with a black and white rug

We love little decorating surprises like the black and white Wyatt rug from Urban Outfitters. When you want to add more drama to your space without adding more color, black is a gutsy choice that can be used as a neutral (especially in a rustic style like this).

boho ikat rug

Boho or casual, this Mixed Ikat rug brings color and style to the living room. Image: West Elm

11. The perfect mix: stripes and ikat

When you love stripes but aren’t really committed to an entire area rug of them, the Ikat Mix rug may be your perfect match. This fun and funky rug mixes the best of bold stripes with a hint of pattern and color. A whimsical rug in pastels and neutral colors can be just the right accent for a casual living room.

Blue area rug

West Elm’s Lapis rug in is a sophisticated choice for transitional decor. Image: West Elm

12. A weathered pattern for maximum versatility

The weathered trend in area rugs is not just pretty, it’s smart. This style mutes colors that could overwhelm your room. The West Elm Lapis rug is a subtle mix of blue, gray and teal.  Softly worn patterns work especially well for boho and beach-inspired decor, but their real strength is how easily they enhance any decorating style.

Which of these rug trends are your favorite? Will you be using any of them to give your living room a makeover?

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Cool Kitchen Backsplashes to Whet Your Appetitehttp://feedproxy.google.com/~r/FreshInspirationForYourHome/~3/nK9-rwbjfuo/https://freshome.com/cool-kitchen-backsplashes/#respondSat, 18 Aug 2018 12:00:03 +0000https://freshome.com/?p=282265The basic function of kitchen backsplashes is to prevent water, food and other types of liquids and solids from damaging the wall behind your kitchen counters. However, backsplashes can be both functional and stylish. There’s a dizzying array of styles to choose from, but we’re skipping the most popular backsplashes (since you’ve probably seen them […]

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The basic function of kitchen backsplashes is to prevent water, food and other types of liquids and solids from damaging the wall behind your kitchen counters. However, backsplashes can be both functional and stylish. There’s a dizzying array of styles to choose from, but we’re skipping the most popular backsplashes (since you’ve probably seen them anyway) so we can highlight some of the coolest options.

Art glass backsplash

A photo of the city’s skyline is the inspiration for this spectacular kitchen backsplash in Melbourne. Image: Visual Resource

According to Katy Brut, interior design consultant at New York Furniture Outlets, “The newest and freshest trend in kitchen interior design is to use uncommon materials, such as metal panels, glass and ceramics.”

Hexagonal tile backsplash

This hexagonal pattern is clean and modern. Image: Trevor Brown Architects

“People are gravitating toward cleaner, modern backsplashes, as opposed to the busier mosaics, to create a timeless look,” says Pace Tropper of TileBar. “The use of simpler tones and designs for the backsplash with pops of color from accent pieces create a kitchen that is more transitional for a long-term investment.”

Solid color sheet glass backsplash

This solid sheet of gray glass provides a sleek, seamless look. Image: thirdstone inc.

This gray, glass sheet backsplash is another example of a cleaner, more modern design and requires virtually no maintenance. Just wipe clean.

Wood and wood-look stone tile backsplash

The latest generation of stone can realistically mimic wood. Image: Chroma Design.

Brut says some homeowners are achieving customized looks by using specially treated (water and mold resistant) solid wood panels.  However, the wood look above was achieved with stone tile.

Can you tell if this is real wood or not? Image: Leicht Westchester

The warm look of wood in this backsplash is replicated in the floor-to-ceiling cabinets and in the under-counter cabinet cut-outs.

Stainless steel metal backsplash

A stainless sheet backsplash is durable and can be cut to fit any space. Image: Langford Design Group

This gives new meaning to the phrase “stainless steel package.” While that term generally refers to stainless steel appliances, this kitchen is stainless steel from floor to ceiling: backsplash, countertop, cabinets and sink.

Back-to-nature window backsplash

Nature always creates a complementary backdrop. Image: David Coleman Architecture

It’s hard to find a better backsplash than nature (but you should probably wear clothes when standing at the sink). Smaller windows are common in kitchens, but a wall of windows makes a cool architectural statement.

Slate backsplash

Arranging the backsplash vertically helps to create depth. Image: Clarke

The slate backsplash in this Asian-inspired kitchen complements the light wood and stainless steel. Slate resists water, stains and spills.

Porcelain tile backsplash

This backsplash adds interest without looking too busy. Image: Georgio Home

“Porcelain-cement tiles are unique materials perfect for kitchen backsplashes because they don’t stain and are quicker to source and install than traditional cement tiles,” explains Matt Karlin, third-generation President and CEO of Nemo Tile + Stone.

Subway tile backsplash

Subway tile remains a popular choice among homeowners. Image: Kitchen Lab Interiors

“Backsplashes are one of the easiest ways to personalize a kitchen, but there’s a reason subway tile is so popular,” says Jonathan Self, a real estate broker for Center Coast Realty in Chicago.

Pablo Picasso backsplash

Kitchen backsplashes can be customized for any style or taste. Image: Key Piece

“Unless it’s a forever home, I’d avoid going too crazy with the design because this can make it harder to sell your home down the road,” Self says. Maybe this Picasso is what he’s talking about. It’s definitely original, but how many homebuyers do you think would like this style, especially in the kitchen?

Tell us what you think in the comments!

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5 Ways to Get a Zen Living Roomhttp://feedproxy.google.com/~r/FreshInspirationForYourHome/~3/mHGhP_d5-4U/https://freshome.com/ways-to-get-a-zen-living-room/#respondFri, 17 Aug 2018 17:00:41 +0000https://freshome.com/?p=286249Merriam-Webster describes Zen as “a state of calm attentiveness in which one’s actions are guided by intuition rather than by conscious effort.” From a colloquial standpoint in the West, we generally use it to describe anything that is calm, serene, simple and soothing, especially when it comes to interior design. Zen spaces are also usually […]

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Merriam-Webster describes Zen as “a state of calm attentiveness in which one’s actions are guided by intuition rather than by conscious effort.” From a colloquial standpoint in the West, we generally use it to describe anything that is calm, serene, simple and soothing, especially when it comes to interior design. Zen spaces are also usually defined by distinctly Japanese design aesthetics, like rock gardens and tatami mat floors. If you love everything Zen, you may be searching for ways incorporate Zen in the central spaces of your home. Read on to learn how to get a Zen living room.

Zen Living Room Indoor Zen Garden

Zen gardens can fit right next to sitting areas. Image: Triptych Design

Indoor Zen garden

When people think Zen, they usually think of Zen gardens. But don’t assume that just because it has the word garden in it, it needs to be outdoors. The unique living space in the photo above puts a Zen garden right in the home. Since Zen gardens are usually made up of sand, stone or gravel, they’re easy to put indoors because they don’t have the upkeep of natural plant life. Your Zen garden can also be for more than show: You can also meditatively rake the Zen garden no matter what the weather looks like outside.

Zen Living Room Buddha Head

The white and gray neutral coloring on the Buddha head fits in well with modern, light color schemes. Image: ASI Interiors

Chic Buddha statues

Zen itself is grounded in a type of Buddhism from Japan. Because of this, one of the easiest ways to get a Zen living room is to find a chic representation of the Buddha. Adding this element to a room allows you to create a Zen focal point.

How Zen you go from there is entirely up to you. It’s a nice way to add an element of Zen, even if you’re not looking to go drastic with your design plans. Also, choosing a chic artsy figure like in the photo above allows you to keep the space more modern, if that’s the style you’re going for.

Zen Living Room Rustic Space

You can apply Zen principles to surprising places, like this rustic mountain home. Image: Locati Architects and Interiors

Combine Zen with other styles

The above tips suggest ways to incorporate Zen into modern stylings, but Zen also complements rustic spaces, creating a rustic chic vibe. Just take the photo above: Something as simple as the light earth tones gives the space a loose, natural Zen feel.

Zen is usually associated with natural elements, so the style pairs well with rustic elements like exposed beams, textured wood flooring and carved art. If possible, combine the style with open views of nature. That creates an even more rustic, natural and soothing Zen vibe.

Zen Living Room Outdoor Zen Garden

Bring that Zen feel inside with sliding doors that open to a stone Zen garden. Image: MM+J Architects

Open to Zen outdoor spaces

Of course, not all of your Zen features have to be in the living room itself. Simply opening your room into a Zen rock garden or having a window view to one can create that sense of Zen. It’s an easy way to add visual style to the Zen living room without installing a full-fledged Zen garden in your home.

This is also a good idea for minimalistic or transitional spaces. The soothing nature of a gravel-based Zen garden pairs well with minimalistic style, and the Zen garden itself is a traditional element that adds interest to a transitional space.

Zen Living Room Japanese Style Room

Japanese design makes your home feel instantly Zen. Image: e-sumai

Incorporate Asian design elements for a Zen living room

Since Zen has its roots in Japan, you may consider using traditional Japanese architectural elements in your living room. The photo above is actually a design from a home in Kyoto. But the traditional tatami floor and paper doors are great sources of inspiration for your own living room design project.

If committing to this style makes you nervous, you could choose one or two elements to suggest it. Try installing one paper sliding door. Or place a tatami mat in the middle of the living room. You might also consider other Japanese elements like koi fish or a short-legged table, also called a chabudai. We’ve covered many ways to incorporate Japanese style into your home if you’re craving more inspiration.

Remember, the goal of Zen design elements is to add a sense of calm to your living spaces — so try not to stress as you decide how to incorporate it! There are many options for achieving that soothing aesthetic, whether you want to go big or understated. Do any of the ideas above make you want to add a little Zen to your home? We’d love to hear about it below.

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